ISSUES: Youth Reform: 110817_Kibera__BobMiller_042

Members of Carrribean Youth Reform wash Matatus off the main road into Kibera. Formerly called Caribbean Youth Group, the organization changed it's name to Caribbean Youth Reform after several violent youth in the neighborhood came under their ranks and were {quote}reformed{quote} under their leadership. Begun in 2008 as a result of the post-election violence, the group of youth operate with the goal of uniting the young people of differing tribes. With over 60 members, the group operates a car and carpet washing business as well as manages a weekly garbage collection project through which they clean up neighborhoods, gather maneur for compost and sort plastics to sell for income. The group plans to soon build a community toilet and bathroom in the area where the work, and they are also organizing a {quote}conflict management and peacekeeping team.{quote} The income generated from their activities is consistent but minimal, says acting secretary Abdallah Juma, age 23, citing lack of funding and financial instability as the groups main hurdle to progress. {quote}We are the founders of this country,{quote} Juma said. The long term goal of the youth group is to see fewer youth unemployed. {quote}Even without government intervention, we as youth can do it ourselves.{quote}
AUGUST 2011

Members of Carrribean Youth Reform wash Matatus off the main road into Kibera. Formerly called Caribbean Youth Group, the organization changed it's name to Caribbean Youth Reform after several violent youth in the neighborhood came under their ranks and were "reformed" under their leadership. Begun in 2008 as a result of the post-election violence, the group of youth operate with the goal of uniting the young people of differing tribes. With over 60 members, the group operates a car and carpet washing business as well as manages a weekly garbage collection project through which they clean up neighborhoods, gather maneur for compost and sort plastics to sell for income. The group plans to soon build a community toilet and bathroom in the area where the work, and they are also organizing a "conflict management and peacekeeping team." The income generated from their activities is consistent but minimal, says acting secretary Abdallah Juma, age 23, citing lack of funding and financial instability as the groups main hurdle to progress.  

"We are the founders of this country," Juma said. The long term goal of the youth group is to see fewer youth unemployed. "Even without government intervention, we as youth can do it ourselves."